WORLD JOURNAL OF ADVANCE
HEALTHCARE RESEARCH

( An ISO 9001:2015 Certified International Journal )

An International Peer Review Journal for Medical Science and Pharma Professionals
World Journal of Advance Healthcare Research (WJAHR) has indexed with various reputed international bodies like : Google Scholar , Index Copernicus , SOCOLAR, China , Research Bible, Fuchu, Tokyo. JAPAN , Cosmos Impact Factor , Scientific Indexing Services (SIS) , UDLedge Science Citation Index , International Impact Factor Services , International Society for Research Activity (ISRA) Journal Impact Factor (JIF) , IFSIJ Measure of Journal Quality , Scientific Journal Impact Factor (SJIF) , International Scientific Indexing, UAE (ISI) (Under Process) , International Impact Factor Services (IIFS) , Web of Science Group (Under Process) , Directory of Research Journals Indexing , Scholar Article Journal Index (SAJI) , International Scientific Indexing ( ISI ) , 

ISSN 2457-0400

Impact Factor  :  5.464

News & Updation

  • Article Invited for Publication

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  • 6th International Conference on Human and Soci

    Venue:FCT Education Resource Center, Abuja- Nigeria                                        September 22-24, 2019

  • WJAHR New Impact Factor

    Its our Pleasure to Inform you that WJAHR Impact Factor has been increased from  4.897 to 5.464 due to high quality Publication at International Level

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    6th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND CURRICULUM STUDIES(ICETC2019) 

     

    Venue: FCT Education Resource Center, Abuja-Nigeria

    September 22-24, 2019

  • New Issue Published

    Its Our pleasure to inform you that, WJAHR 1 March 2021 Issue has been Published, Kindly check it on http://www.wjahr.com/home/current_issues

  • WJAHR MARCH ISSUE PUBLISHED

    MARCH 2021 Issue has been successfully launched on 1 March 2021.

Best Paper Awards

World Journal of Advance Healthcare Research (WJAHR)Honored the authors with best paper award, monthly based on the innovation of research work. Best paper will be selected by our expert panel.

Best Article of current issue

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Indexing

Abstract

MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS IN CLINICAL DENTISTRY: HOW TECHNOLOGY CAN SAFEGUARD YOUR DENTAL TEAM

*Dr. Jay Rashmikant Sejpal (BDS)

ABSTRACT

The practice of dentistry by all members of the clinical team involves static posture, precise and repetitive motions, long work hours, and suboptimal ergonomics.[1,2] The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among dentists and dental hygienists can range from 64% to 93%, with prolonged static postures (PSPs) and repetitive movements being listed as major risk factors. 3-5 More troubling were the results of a study in the United Kingdom that found that MSDs were the most frequent cause of premature retirement among dentists.[6] The World Health Organization defines work-related MSDs as “disorders or injuries affecting muscles, tendons, joints, ligaments, and bones mainly caused by mechanical overload of the respective biological structures. Potential overload of tissues results from high intensity forces or torques acting on and inside the body.”[7] The types of MSDs in dentistry broadly fall into 3 categories:1. neck and shoulder disorders, hand and wrist disorders, and back disorders.2. Focusing specifically on hand and wrist disorders, dentists and dental hygienists suffer from more hand, wrist, and arm pain than the general population.[8-10] Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common MSD within the hand and wrist disorder category and is caused by compression of the median nerve, causing symptoms to include numbness, tingling, or pain in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. There are many suspected causes of CTS, and besides a history of trauma to the wrist, contributing factors can include an overactive pituitary gland, an underactive thyroid gland, and rheumatoid arthritis.[10] Females are 3 times more likely to develop CTS, with diabetic and obese individuals also being at increased risk.[11] General work-related risk factors for CTS include mechanical stress to the hand and wrist, forceful exertion, repetitive motions, and PSP.[7] In dentistry, activities such as forceful gripping of small instruments, flexing the wrist forward, vibration, and repetitive motions for long periods of time have been implicated in the development of CTS symptoms.[8,11]

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